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20121201
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line of mac computers in china, apple is set to bring some of its manufacturing jobs back home to the usa. is this a political move or is this a clear-cut economic manufacturing move? here to discuss is "forbes" columnist and china export gordon chang, the author of "the coming collapse of china." serious question, do you think actual's doing this for politics or economics? >> actually both. but when you look at china, though, their manufacturing days are over. americans are less produmore pr less prone to strike -- >> are you sure american works are less prone to strike? we've reported on this show a whole bunch of strikes, including the hostess twinkie companies, the ports of los angeles and out on the west coast. we have obama in the white house. the unions are going whild here. in all seriousness, i don't think unions are any more placid here than they are in china. >> but in china, workers go out on wildcat strikes all the time. foxconn which manufactures about 97% of apple's products, they've been really subject to labor troubles, from suicides to strikes. so i think appl
-- they're pumping in liquidity. so is china. now, in the long run, we may come to regret this very much. in the short run, i have a feeling all this liquidity is a bigger issue than the fiscal cliff for stocks. >> for stocks. i totally agree with you. we're printing money all around the world. it's good for the stock market. but we're pumping liquidity in, lower growth forecast from the ex, just about any acronym entity that you think of, we've seen lower growth forecast at the same time the credit spreads have come back down. yes, i think things are calmer. these are good things for equities. the yields on corporate bonds, you have to go out seven, eight years to get money on junk paper. corporations have more cash on their balance sheet. they're buying back shares. >> ting the financial picture -- there's nobody that's cutting marginal tax rates. nobody's deregulating and there's nobody that's limiting government. i get that. there's no supply side policies going on. but when you look hat the financial fear spreads or the financial risk spreads -- and here's one, banks. i saw dick bov
. they're probably going to succeed. some people are saying that china is also reinflating and they had a soft landing. then what about europe? i've seen some people touting europe. if you look at the financial fear indicators in europe, that crisis is basically over. >> well, yes, it is. i don't know if you can capture in the frame on the camera. what i'm doing here, i'm patting myself on the back. who is it who's been telling your viewers for two years every time there's one of these trumped-up crises in europe to buy it. now there's been a solution. europe has been stabilized. it's actually the brightest place for investors on the planet. i'm sorry you missed the bottom but it's not too late. you look at after hearing that segment on the u.s. government making the decision to debase paper coins by turning them into -- paper money by turning them into junk disposable paper coins? well what would you rather own? the ten-year american bond, treasury bond yielding what, 1.6%? or would you rather have a spanish bond denominated in the strongest currency in the world, the euro, paying 5.5%
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3